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Faculty Shortage

When people talk about making it knowledge based economy; I get worried. Sorry, don’t jump to the conclusion. I am not against that idea at all.  But there are certain genuine concerns that bother me. The biggest hurdle in the path of realizing this dream is dearth of good faculty who could ignite the minds of students in the classrooms. The problem is even more acute for professional technical institutions.

This is not that I am first one who is singing these lyrics. I run a large technical institutions of learning and I feel how serious is the problem. U.N. Rao committee had pointed out in 2001 that Indian engineering institutions required Total 60,970 teachers, broken down into: 8,710 professors, 17,420 readers and 34,840 lecturers In terms of professional qualifications, what was required were 26,130 Ph Ds and 34,840 M Techs. However, I just don’t want to mention what was the actual availability of teachers. It was found that there was yawning gap of 70% faculty members. The condition was even worse in state run universities.

Condition in premier institutions such as IIT is far from satisfactory. According to the data compiled by IIT-Delhi Alumni Association in 2004, at the Indian Institute of Technology, in New Delhi, 29 percent of faculty positions were vacant. Now, even a naïve would tell you that since hardly any recruitment has taken place in the institution during the last seven years, it is obvious that some of the teachers must have retired leading to worsening of the situation.

Faculty scenario at IIM’s is not well. Newly opened IIM Rohtak has only one permanent teacher and rest others are visiting faculties. My question is can we dream our country to make it a knowledge economy considering this kind of situation.

In Patna University there are less than 500 teachers to impart knowledge to 20,000 students. This is abysmal scenario. We, too, face lot of problems in attracting quality talent to teach in the classrooms. It seems good teachers have been soaked like sponge by other more lucrative options.

The immediate solutions which come to mind are by increasing the retirement age of faculties and by increasing the recruitment of new teachers. Increasing the age can fix the problem temporarily and to have recruitment of high quality teachers one needs to change the entire atmosphere and to reposition the teaching profession. There is a need to attract good talent and the profession itself should be an incentive. This can be done and we have a good example before us. We were able to intake high quality faculty when we started the Indian Institutes of Technology. It is said that about 360 of the 400 faculty were foreign-trained. It needs a holistic approach which should not just look on the monetary aspect of the shortage. It can happen, only proper will from the policy makers is needed.

When people talk about making it knowledge based economy; I get worried. Sorry, don’t jump to the conclusion. I am not against that idea at all.  But there are certain genuine concerns that bother me. The biggest hurdle in the path of realizing this dream is dearth of good faculty who could ignite the minds of students in the classrooms. The problem is even more acute for professional technical institutions.

This is not that I am first one who is singing these lyrics. I run a large technical institutions of learning and I feel how serious is the problem. U.N. Rao committee had pointed out in 2001 that Indian engineering institutions required Total 60,970 teachers, broken down into: 8,710 professors, 17,420 readers and 34,840 lecturers In terms of professional qualifications, what was required were 26,130 Ph Ds and 34,840 M Techs. However, I just don’t want to mention what was the actual availability of teachers. It was found that there was yawning gap of 70% faculty members. The condition was even worse in state run universities.

Condition in premier institutions such as IIT is far from satisfactory. According to the data compiled by IIT-Delhi Alumni Association in 2004, at the Indian Institute of Technology, in New Delhi, 29 percent of faculty positions were vacant. Now, even a naïve would tell you that since hardly any recruitment has taken place in the institution during the last seven years, it is obvious that some of the teachers must have retired leading to worsening of the situation.

Faculty scenario at IIM’s is not well. Newly opened IIM Rohtak has only one permanent teacher and rest others are visiting faculties. My question is can we dream our country to make it a knowledge economy considering this kind of situation.

In Patna University there are less than 500 teachers to impart knowledge to 20,000 students. This is abysmal scenario. We, too, face lot of problems in attracting quality talent to teach in the classrooms. It seems good teachers have been soaked like sponge by other more lucrative options.

The immediate solutions which come to mind are by increasing the retirement age of faculties and by increasing the recruitment of new teachers. Increasing the age can fix the problem temporarily and to have recruitment of high quality teachers one needs to change the entire atmosphere and to reposition the teaching profession. There is a need to attract good talent and the profession itself should be an incentive. This can be done and we have a good example before us. We were able to intake high quality faculty when we started the Indian Institutes of Technology. It is said that about 360 of the 400 faculty were foreign-trained. It needs a holistic approach which should not just look on the monetary aspect of the shortage. It can happen, only proper will from the policy makers is needed.

When people talk about making it knowledge based economy; I get worried. Sorry, don’t jump to the conclusion. I am not against that idea at all.  But there are certain genuine concerns that bother me. The biggest hurdle in the path of realizing this dream is dearth of good faculty who could ignite the minds of students in the classrooms. The problem is even more acute for professional technical institutions.

This is not that I am first one who is singing these lyrics. I run a large technical institutions of learning and I feel how serious is the problem. U.N. Rao committee had pointed out in 2001 that Indian engineering institutions required Total 60,970 teachers, broken down into: 8,710 professors, 17,420 readers and 34,840 lecturers In terms of professional qualifications, what was required were 26,130 Ph Ds and 34,840 M Techs. However, I just don’t want to mention what was the actual availability of teachers. It was found that there was yawning gap of 70% faculty members. The condition was even worse in state run universities.

Condition in premier institutions such as IIT is far from satisfactory. According to the data compiled by IIT-Delhi Alumni Association in 2004, at the Indian Institute of Technology, in New Delhi, 29 percent of faculty positions were vacant. Now, even a naïve would tell you that since hardly any recruitment has taken place in the institution during the last seven years, it is obvious that some of the teachers must have retired leading to worsening of the situation.

Faculty scenario at IIM’s is not well. Newly opened IIM Rohtak has only one permanent teacher and rest others are visiting faculties. My question is can we dream our country to make it a knowledge economy considering this kind of situation.

In Patna University there are less than 500 teachers to impart knowledge to 20,000 students. This is abysmal scenario. We, too, face lot of problems in attracting quality talent to teach in the classrooms. It seems good teachers have been soaked like sponge by other more lucrative options.

The immediate solutions which come to mind are by increasing the retirement age of faculties and by increasing the recruitment of new teachers. Increasing the age can fix the problem temporarily and to have recruitment of high quality teachers one needs to change the entire atmosphere and to reposition the teaching profession. There is a need to attract good talent and the profession itself should be an incentive. This can be done and we have a good example before us. We were able to intake high quality faculty when we started the Indian Institutes of Technology. It is said that about 360 of the 400 faculty were foreign-trained. It needs a holistic approach which should not just look on the monetary aspect of the shortage. It can happen, only proper will from the policy makers is needed.

When people talk about making it knowledge based economy; I get worried. Sorry, don’t jump to the conclusion. I am not against that idea at all.  But there are certain genuine concerns that bother me. The biggest hurdle in the path of realizing this dream is dearth of good faculty who could ignite the minds of students in the classrooms. The problem is even more acute for professional technical institutions.

This is not that I am first one who is singing these lyrics. I run a large technical institutions of learning and I feel how serious is the problem. U.N. Rao committee had pointed out in 2001 that Indian engineering institutions required Total 60,970 teachers, broken down into: 8,710 professors, 17,420 readers and 34,840 lecturers In terms of professional qualifications, what was required were 26,130 Ph Ds and 34,840 M Techs. However, I just don’t want to mention what was the actual availability of teachers. It was found that there was yawning gap of 70% faculty members. The condition was even worse in state run universities.

Condition in premier institutions such as IIT is far from satisfactory. According to the data compiled by IIT-Delhi Alumni Association in 2004, at the Indian Institute of Technology, in New Delhi, 29 percent of faculty positions were vacant. Now, even a naïve would tell you that since hardly any recruitment has taken place in the institution during the last seven years, it is obvious that some of the teachers must have retired leading to worsening of the situation.

Faculty scenario at IIM’s is not well. Newly opened IIM Rohtak has only one permanent teacher and rest others are visiting faculties. My question is can we dream our country to make it a knowledge economy considering this kind of situation.

In Patna University there are less than 500 teachers to impart knowledge to 20,000 students. This is abysmal scenario. We, too, face lot of problems in attracting quality talent to teach in the classrooms. It seems good teachers have been soaked like sponge by other more lucrative options.

The immediate solutions which come to mind are by increasing the retirement age of faculties and by increasing the recruitment of new teachers. Increasing the age can fix the problem temporarily and to have recruitment of high quality teachers one needs to change the entire atmosphere and to reposition the teaching profession. There is a need to attract good talent and the profession itself should be an incentive. This can be done and we have a good example before us. We were able to intake high quality faculty when we started the Indian Institutes of Technology. It is said that about 360 of the 400 faculty were foreign-trained. It needs a holistic approach which should not just look on the monetary aspect of the shortage. It can happen, only proper will from the policy makers is needed.